May 24, 2022

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Gamers Sejati

UK to Ban Gambling Advertisements Featuring Sports Stars and Celebrities

By Simon Wright Apr 5, 2022

This morning brings news that as from 1st October later this year, all advertising campaigns featuring sports stars and celebrities, to include social media influencers are to be banned from UK shores, with these measures being taken to protect minors and those vulnerable to the scourge of gambling addiction.

Since the gambling act was overhauled back in 2005 by the then Labour government, the gambling industry has seen a proliferation in its exposure on televised media and in print form, with the utilisation of sports and reality tv stars and other celebrities being used to push their brands.

The changes have been brought in by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and will see current adverts on  television featuring stars such as for example Ray Winstone for bet365 fall by the wayside. In addition to televised advertisements being affected by the rule change, the ban will also cover showing of team kit  and sports stadia.

The Director of the Committee of Advertising Practice, Shahriar Coupal said: “The days of gambling ads featuring sports stars, video game imagery and other content of strong appeal to under-18s are numbered.”

“By ending these practices, our new rules invite a new era for gambling ads, more particular to the adult audience they can target and more befitting of the age-restricted product they’re promoting.”

“No more social media influencers, TV stars or other celebrities popular with children inviting us to bet on red. And, no more gambling ads featuring video game images or gameplay familiar to many children’s lives.”

However, the contentious issue of team sponsorship by gambling firms which is at an all time high in the top two flights of professional football in England will not be affected by the rule change. This is due to the Advertising Standards Authority ( ASA ) who are responsible for the code of conduct for advertisements in the UK not currently having the power to regulate in this specific area.

Adding to her comments, Coupal went on to state: “This might not seem immediately significant but its effect – particularly in a World Cup year – will be dramatic.”

“By ending these practices, our new rules invite a new era for gambling ads, more particular to the adult audience they can target and more befitting of the age-restricted product they’re promoting.”

As well as televised advertisements, the rule change by CAP will also cover and apply all broadcast media, such as TV, radio and cinema ads, as well as non-broadcast such as online and in newspapers or on billboards and posters.